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Comparison of Globe and Flat-Earth Model Predictions with Reality

Monday, December 3, 2018 - 23:15 | Author: wabis | Topics: FlatEarth, Interactive | Comments(7)
This page shows scenes computed with a Globe Model and a Flat-Earth Model of the Earth and compares them with corresponding Real Images of the same scene to see, which Model-Predictions match Reality.

Content

All Globe and Flat-Earth Model Predictions are computed with my Curvature App. Please note that the horizon of the Flat-Earth Model always is at Eye-Level of the Globe Model. On the Globe the horizon is never at Eye-Level so all objects near or behind the horizon are below Eye-Level too.

Causeway View from Marriott Hotel

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model

This scene shows the 38 km long Causeway Bridge at Lake Pontchartrain, Lousiana. The image was taken from the 15th floor of the Marriott Hotel at the south side of the lake using a telescope with a zoom factor of about 2000 mm (35 mm equivalent).

Source: Screenshot from Soundly's Youtube Channel

Causeway View to Hotel Marriott

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image through Theodolite
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model
  • Theodolite View

This scene shows the 38 km long Causeway Bridge at Lake Pontchartrain from the north side looking to the Marriott Hotel (Zoom about 3000 mm). Note that in the Theodolite View the horizontal line of the crosshair of the Theodolite is exactly at Eye-Level.

Source: Screenshot from Soundly's Youtube Channel

Causeway View Left

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model

Source: Screenshot from Soundly's Youtube Channel

Causeway View Center

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model

Source: Screenshot from Soundly's Youtube Channel

Lake Ponchartrain Transmission Line

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model

This scene shows one of the Lake Pontchartrain Transmission Lines, which crosses the lake in a perfectly straigh line. Over a distance of 25.9 km there are 85 identical towers with a separation of 300 m. The towers have a height of 23 m. The last 2 towers have a height of 64 m.

Image from: Soundly Proving the Curvature of the Earth at Lake Pontchartrain (Metabunk); Soundly's Youtube Channel

Below Eye Level, Miles Davis

ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction of Curvature App
ZoomImage-InformationsFlat Earth Model Prediction of Curvature App
  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image from this video by Miles Davis
ZoomImage-InformationsOverlay Image and Globe Model Prediction of Curvature App. Image from this video by Miles Davis
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction of Curvature App
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model Overlayed
  • Globe Model

This observation from Miles Davis, like all other observations on this page, confirms without any doubt that the earth is a Globe. Miles Davis is at an altidude of 210 m. The middle bridge tower is at sea level and has a height of 210 m. All hills in the distance are far taller than 210 m but they appear below the 210 m line or only very slightly above.

Note that the bridge towers and hills are all far below eye level. This can only be recognized in reality by using an auto level or theodolite. But anyway, the Flat Earth Model Prediction looks nowhere near like the image, while the Globe Model Prediction, using Standard Refraction, matches perfectly!

Note also, that even the bridge towers are the same height as the observer, they apear below eye level, because the earth curves down with increasing distance.

Observation Data Miles Davis

  • Observer location: Traprain Law 55°57'47.32"N 2°40'21.19"W
  • Bridge location: Edinburgh 56°0'16.38"N 3°24'45.32"W

You can click the links in the table below to open my Curvature App with the corresponding hill shown. You can than play with the settings. To change the transparency of the overlayed image, click on the image. Clicking left of the center makes it more transparent, clicking right more opaque.

Hill Height Distance SidePos Coordinates
Earl's Seat 578 m 101.6 km −3000 m 56°1'31.35"N 4°17'49.79"W
Dun Brach 540 m 97.2 km −2700 m 56°1'37.89"N 4°13'16.05"W
Meikle Bin 570 m 91.8 km −3150 m 56°0'50.40"N 4°8'18.11"W
Cairnoch Hill 413 m 89.1 km 450 m 56°1'14.56"N 4°0'2.16"W
Stronend 511 m 96.4 km 3460 m 56°4'43.46"N 4°12'10.34"W

SidePos: is the horizontal distance from the center line of the image at the distance of the hill.

The observer Height in the Curvature App is set to 210 m and the Zoom to 420 mm. Standard Refraction of k = 0.17 is set. The measuring rods (bridge towers) are at a distance of 46.5 km from the observer and have a size of 210 m. Data providet by Miles Davis and confirmed by me using google earth.

Salt Lake City

Observation of Salt Lake City from 40 km distance (top 3 images parts), showing how the water horizon hides the bottom part of the city as predicded by the Globe Model. The Flat-Earth model predictions do never hide anything of the city and do not match the footage at all.

ZoomGlobe Model Prediction of Refraction Simulator
ZoomFlat-Earth Prediction of Refraction Simulator
  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomReal Image from Salt Lake City
ZoomGlobe Model Prediction of Refraction Simulator
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Model Prediction of Curvature App
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model

City observed and simulated at observer heights of 0.5 m, 1.5 m and 7.5 m. The bottom image part is from another location and higher up to show that the city is about 100 m above the Salt Lake.

Note that the simulation took the bottom image as the background. Because this image is taken from a different angle and zoom than the top 3 real images, the viewing angle and zoom to the buildings in the simulations do not match the footage. But the hidden parts do match because the vertical scaling of the buildings is the same in the simulation as on the footage.

Because the refraction was not known I had to try to find a refraction curve that matches the footage. I found that the water was probably slightly warmer than the air and some Stooping was goeing on. The Simulation shows, that no matter whether you chose zero Refraction, Standard Refraction or the Refraction Curve I used, there are always some parts of the bottom of the city and the buildings hidden from 1.5 m to 7.5 m. Only the amount and the distortion changes slightly.

Please try the Refraction Simulator yourself.

Comcast Skyscraper from Apple Pie Hill

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
Image-InformationsReal Image through an Auto Level
Image-InformationsReal Image overlayed with Globe Model Prediction
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model Overlayed

View to the Comcast Skyscraper of Philadelphia (gray building left of the crosshair) through the Auto Level of Jesse Kozlowski (a Geodetic Surveyor) from on top of Apple Pie Hill (62 m) Fire Tower (18 m) in southern New Jersey.

The horizontal crosshair is at auto level elevation of about 78 m (256 Feet) NAVD88 and shows the Eye-Level plane from the observers location. The Eye-Level plane is perpendicular to the vertical at the observer location. The distance to the top southeast corner of the Comcast Center is 52.15 km (171,100.8 Feet = 32.4 Miles). The top of the skyscraper is at elevation 307.85 m (1010 Feet) NAVD88.

The crosshair (Eye-Level Plane) intersects the Comcast building at approximately 42 m (138 feet) +/- down from the top at 266 m (873 Feet). This is because the earth curves down. On a Flat Earth the crosshair (Eye-Level Plane) would intersect the building at Eye-Level altitude of 72 m, that is about 2 scales from the bottom on the measuring rod..

A Refraction Coefficient of k = 0.13 is applied on the Globe Model, which corresponds to Standard Refraction over land.

The yellow/red measuring rod in the model is 400 m tall with a 40 m scaling. The horizon on the Globe Model is at a distance of 33.8 km (21.0 Miles) and has dropped 156 m (512 Feet) from Eye-Level or 78 m (256 Feet) from sea level corresponding to a Dip Angle of 0.264° from Eye-Level.

Oil Platform Grace

  • Swap
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model
ZoomImage-InformationsReal Image of Oil Platform Grace
ZoomImage-InformationsGlobe Earth Model Prediction
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model

Distance to Oil Platform = 28 km; Height = 37.2 m; Observer Altitude = 72 m; Anacapa Island Distance = 50.1 km; Height = 75 m; Zoom = 2000 mm

You can find Some graphical Explanation for this scene and a Demo in the Curvature App with all data to the scene. See also Video Oil Platforms and Islands | Observation and Analysis from Jon McIntyre

Windfarm Ormonde

ZoomImage-InformationsPanorama Image and Globe Model Prediction Overlayed
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model Overlay
  • Globe Model
  • Flat-Earth Model

View from St. Bees (GB) to Ormonde Windfarm:

Distance = 43.6 km; Observer Altitude = 14 m; Refraction = 0.2 (medium); Hub Height = 88 m; Tides = 2 m; Hidden = 57..75 m

Images from the ISS

ZoomImage-InformationsTest whether the graphics of the simulation matches a real image taken from the ISS:
Height = 400 km; 35mm focal lengt f = 28 mm; Line Spacing 48.91 km
Date of recording: 16.09.2016 20:55; Source: NASA; Original image with EXIF Informations
ZoomImage-InformationsTest whether the graphics of the simulation matches a real image taken from the ISS:
Height = 400 km; 35mm focal lengt f = 28 mm; Line Spacing 48.91 km
Date of recording: 16.09.2016 20:55; Source: NASA; Original image with EXIF Informations
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model Overlay

This image was taken from one of the astronauts Sergey Ryzhikov, Shane Kimbrough, Andrey Borisenko, Kate Rubins, Commander Anatoly Ivanishin or Takuya Onishi on board of the ISS Expedition 49 with a NIKON D4 camera using a 28 mm wide angle lens (35 mm equivalent, no fisheye). Links to the original image and all EXIF data are provided.

ZoomImage-InformationsAnother picture taken from the ISS showing penumbra from the solar eclipse.
Height = 400 km; 35mm focal length f = 20 mm; Line Spacing 55.6 km
Original image with EXIF Informations
ZoomImage-InformationsAnother picture taken from the ISS showing penumbra from the solar eclipse.
Height = 400 km; 35mm focal length f = 20 mm; Line Spacing 55.6 km
Original image with EXIF Informations
  • Blink Test
  • Reality
  • Globe Model Overlay

This image shows the moon's shadow (penumbra) from the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. It was taken from one of the astronauts Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer, Peggy Whitson, Paolo Nespoli, Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin or Sergey Ryazanskiy. It was taken with a NIKON D4 camera using a 20 mm wide angle lens (35 mm equivalent, no fisheye). Links to the original image and all EXIF data are provided.

Elon Mask's Tesla in Space

Comments

1Marc 2/16/2018 | 14:51

Heyo, der absolute Hammer!
Flat Earth rest in peace!
Vielen Dank!
Gruess
Marc

21 4/7/2018 | 15:59

why on flat earth skyline starts from eye level?? wtf with u? and where is perspective, dude?

3wabiswalter@bislins.ch (Walter Bislin, Author of this Page) 4/7/2018 | 16:31

Skyline on FE starts from eye level if your eyes are near the ground. As higher you go, the lower the skyline appears with respect to the horizon line, depending on the distance to the skyline. Check out Flat-Earth: Finding the curvature of the Earth.

Perspective is built into the model. In fact the model is based on perspective. Perspective says, the angular size of objects decreases with distance, so they appear smaller. But you can zoom in to magnify the object to any size, depending on the zoom capabilities of your device.

4Marcos Storchevoy 4/26/2018 | 03:06

Walter, you have impressed me in every way imaginable with your flawless work! Keep posting evidence for the globe! Because the globe, is reality, and the space pizza, is a fantasy.

5Christian Augustin 6/9/2018 | 16:29

Feine Arbeit! Hochgradig beindruckend, alles unter einen Hut zu bringen. Ich habe schon Probleme mit Google die notwendigen Formeln und Modelle zu finden, und das hier ist alles in einer Packung!

6Gleem 11/27/2018 | 12:58

Hahaha its so funny watching you match up the curve of the earth on the ISS when they confirm they use GoPro FishEye lenses, and the fact that the ISS only see's 3% of the earth at any one time, it should show a flat horizon silly.. You have literally just matched a GoPro fisheye to the curve of the earth hahahah:
https://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-spacewalk-iss-forgot-gopro-sd-card-livestream

7wabiswalter@bislins.ch (Walter Bislin, Author of this Page) 11/27/2018 | 19:41

Gleem: they confirm they use GoPro FishEye lenses

Do you really think NASA and all astronauts use all the same camera for all images they ever take? Only because some of the images may be taken with a GoPro camera does not mean that ALL images are taken with a GoPro camera, agreed?

The linked article refers to a camera used at space walks, which have to record as much of the field of view as possible for documentation and review. For such applications it is common (on earth too) to use GoPro cameras with fisheye lenses. But the images of the earth are taken by full frame cameras with expensive non distorting lenses.

NASA states on each image they publish what camera and lenses are used. This infos are embeded in the original images and I listed the relevant data below the images. I have chosen deliberately images that were not taken using fisheye lenses, because my App can not simulate fisheye lenses. You can go to the linked website, download the original full size image and see this embeded EXIF data yourself (right click the image and choose Properties). Note: I have replaced one of the images, because I could not find the original with the EXIF data embeded anymore.

Gleem: it should show a flat horizon silly..

No it should not, silly. Did you ever make a calculation or at least a scale model? No, of course not because it could show that you are wrong.

From an altitude of 400 km you see the horizon circle with a radius of 2200 km from above. So no, a circle of radius 2200 km viewed from 400 km above looks not flat, as my Curvature App shows. Note that the radius of the horizon circle is about 1/3 of the radius of the earth. You can really only see a circular section of about 3% of the surface of the earth:

(1)
A_\mathrm{earth} = 4 \cdot \pi \cdot {R_\mathrm{earth}}^2 = 510 \times 10^{6}\ \mathrm{km}^{2}
(2)
A_\mathrm{view} = \pi \cdot {r_\mathrm{horizon}}^2 = 15 \times 10^{6}\ \mathrm{km}^{2}
(3)
ratio = { A_\mathrm{view} \over A_\mathrm{earth} } = 0{.}029 \approx 3\%

Gleem: You have literally just matched a GoPro fisheye to the curve of the earth

No I did not. I downloaded the original image from the NASA website, assuring that they were not taken with a fisheye lens, loaded it unaltered into the Curvature App, entered the altitude of the ISS and the focal length of the camera lens as listed in the embeded EXIF data, rotated and moved the calculated grid as is so that it meets the horizon of the image.

The prediction of the Globe Earth Model from my Curvature App matches exactly what is photographed from the ISS. No deceitful manipulation done.

And of course you ignore all other examples shown on this page, which you can go and observe yourself.

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